Rock Climbing Photos

Dying Light: Platinum Edition Switch NSP Free Download
Dying Light: Platinum Edition Switch NSP Free Download Dying Light: Platinum Edition Switch NSP Free Download Romslab Dying Light: Platinum Edition Switch NSP Free Download The good news is, Dying Light: Platinum Edition on Switch isn’t something you should avoid. Well, unless the idea of being let loose in an open world full of zombies doesn’t appeal to you. Of course, concessions have been made to get the game running on a device that has such little power compared to other consoles on the market, but they don’t compromise the core experience.ROMSLAB.COM BEST SWITCH GAMES In case you’ve been living under a rock for the last six years or so, Dying Light is Techland’s follow up to Dead Island. But there are some major differences. They’re not set in the same world, for example, and Dying Light has a day and night cycle that makes its world particularly dangerous to explore once the sun has gone down. Perhaps the biggest difference between the two, however, is Dying Light‘s focus on parkour. weapons come in very useful While weapons come in very useful during your Harran exploits, Crane’s biggest asset is his athleticism. With the city streets full of zombies, it’s safer to get around via rooftops. And so, your ability to run, jump and climb with finesse is a boon to your survival. You can enhance Crane’s abilities throughout the course of the game, too, allowing him to further run rings around his adversaries, or more easily put them down. romslab.com/dying-light-platinum-edition-switch-nsp-free-...
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  • Taken on October 19, 2021
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Red Splash
Red Splash Leftovers and outtakes; just a blob of color, this one.. Overall color around here isn't very good; just pockets here and there if you search hard enough, and if the light is right. Probably it's just been too warm and wet. This is Rock House Reservation and Carter Pond, in case you're in the area and want to check it out. Good for an easy hike and light rock climbing. Kids like the cave-like crevices found in the larger rock formation (the 'rock house'). I hope all are having a terrific week so far.
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On Mount Margaret, Washington
On Mount Margaret, Washington
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Lees Moor Tunnel - 1533yds.
Lees Moor Tunnel - 1533yds. Lees Moor Tunnel - 1,533yds. Lees Moor Tunnel is a long abandoned railway tunnel on the former Great Northern Railway line between Queensbury and Keighley in West Yorkshire, The former dual track Tunnel is just north of the Cullingworth, Reports suggest the due to the pitch black darkness inside and the deafening squealing from the wheels on the 1 in 50 radius curve that drivers and traincrew nicknamed it the “Hell Hole” after closure to passenger traffic the tunnels saw brief use in various experiments involving the effects of smoke inhalation and cancer. The railway line was promoted under the Halifax, Thornton & Keighley Railway act from 1873, despite objections form the Midland Railway and the Lanarkshire and Yorkshire Railways the Great Northern bid was successful and the line opened to goods traffic in April 1884, Lees Moor Tunnel took almost 6 years to finish with work starting at the Cullingworth end in 1878 and full completion in 1884, The ground through which the tunnel was bored was almost solid rock and had a radius of 1 in 50 with a decline of 1 in 78 towards Keighley. This meant that a train leaving Cullingworth going to Keighley actually entered the tunnel heading west and when leaving the tunnel at its northern portal it was heading north east. The tunnel was built without ventilation shafts and so became hazardous for crews on slower trains due to greasy rails on the line going up from Ingrow East railway station, a train could take almost ten minutes to clear Lees Moor Tunnel even experienced crews told how they used to lie flat on the cab of the steam engine to try and get more air to breathe. In 1887, it was suggested that the northern portal would be useful as the position of a junction for a new railway over the moors to Colne, The projected railway would head westwards past cross roads and would use overbridges and viaducts to cross the Worth Valley Railway line a 90 degree angle before going on through Stanbury and Trawden and down into Colne. The Great Northern were favoured for this project as their railway climbed so high out of the Worth Valley as opposed to the Midland line which stayed on the valley floor. A decapitated and horribly mutilated man's body was found in the tunnel near to the Cross Roads portal in March 1891 by a platelayer. It was estimated that his age was around 37 and that a train had caused his injuries rather than by other means as his body was still warm. On 24 April 1942, a 50 year old platelayer was killed by a train as it exited the northern portal. Thomas B Lambert was with two other men on a maintenance schedule when the accident occurred, The entire line from Queensbury to Keighley was closed to passengers in May 1955 with closure to goods traffic in May 1956. After closure, the tunnel at Lees Moor was used by BR and staff from a London hospital to test for smoke emissions from both diesel and steam locomotives. The tests were in relation to cancer and the inside of the tunnel and the lack of ventilation shafts helped to keep the smoke lingering for advanced measuring. Two BR Class 20 diesel locomotives and an A3 Steam Locomotive 60081 'Shotover' were provided for the testing. The lines around Cullingworth, including those through Lees Moor Tunnel, were also used for brake testing on DMU’s that were then being deployed by British Rail this led to speculation that the line was to be re-opened, which was unfounded the tracks were finally removed in 1963, After closure, the eastern portal was bricked up and the northern portal was gated so that the tunnel could be used for caravan and motorhome storage. The roof of the tunnel had to be lined with polythene sheeting as no ventilation shafts were present in the construction resulting in a heavy moisture atmosphere. After two failed attempts to gain access we finally secured a set of ladders long enough to safely gain entry ladders had the be extended to nearly 20ft...One of my most memorable tunnels from the West Yorkshire set although once the stored caravans are reached its very repetitive, we had a mooch right up to the northern portal, lots of decaying caravans not sure I’d pay to store one in those conditions, this tunnels is riddled with moisture ingress and spalling brick and stone work lots of missing mortar in the crown no doubt from years of water ingress and little maintenance work, Cable hangers / pulley wheels line the walls throughout and regular brick refuges are present cut into the stone walls. Once we reached the caravans the first dozen or so were in poor condition one had even collapsed its probable that they break redundant caravans within the tunnel, the debris littering the trackbed would more than likely confirm this theory, I stopped photographing at this point as there’s little of interest plus it’s probably not wise to display such things, We tried to photograph the northern portal but access was denied although the portal has been disguised to look more like a factory unit. The amount of water falling from the roof was biblical as can be seen from the photos. Thanks All.
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Climbing in the slate quarry
Climbing in the slate quarry dinorwic
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Tree Over the Canyon
Tree Over the Canyon Tree Over the Canyon. I can't be objective at all about this picture as there is a story behind it. I'm not a hiker, nor athletic, and haven't learned the lesson yet that, yes, I'm old. (And from sea level.) I saw this tree and the climb looked doable to me. A young gal was hiking past and I asked her opinion: "Oh sure, 30 minutes." I was with my friend Bob who had no interest in scaling the hill but didn't discourage me (enough). I figured an hour. Off I went. I knew Bob was waiting which played heavily on my mind as the hill got steeper, and the terrain more challenging. The top third was mostly scree. ("Scree is a collection of broken rock fragments at the base of crags, mountain cliffs, volcanoes or valley shoulders that has accumulated through periodic rockfall from adjacent cliff faces.") Every step up included some slide down until at last I got close to the level of the tree, where the rock was more intact, albeit steeper. Feeling the guilt of having Bob wait so long I took only a few shots and "raced" back down the hill. (Translate "raced" to sliding on my backside down the top 2/3rds. Total round trip was at least 2.5 hours during which Bob was ready to call in the troops. Being the great guy that he is he didn't hold it against me (I hope) and I gave him my proxy for whatever he wanted to do for the rest of the trip, if not longer! Thanks Bob. We pledged that in the future we would stick together although he couldn't help pointing out from then on every tree we saw on a hill, asking me if I wanted to go for it. So, I don't know if this is a great picture but it's an experience I'll never forget. (Eastern Sierras)
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Incredible summit view from Sgurr Alasdair, highest point on the 6,000 offshore islands of Britain. Left to right, Isles of Eigg, Soay, Rum, Sanday, Canna and Outer Hebrides. Glenbrittle and beach, bottom right.
Incredible summit view from Sgurr Alasdair, highest point on the 6,000 offshore islands of Britain. Left to right, Isles of Eigg, Soay, Rum, Sanday, Canna and Outer Hebrides. Glenbrittle and beach, bottom right. Commentary. 08:00, my son, James, and I left base-camp at Glen Brittle beach. Ninety minutes in and the gentle foothills are behind us. As we stare into Coire Lagan, Sgurr Alasdair looks awesome, impenetrable, and unclimbable. As we summit the corrie’s smooth-rocked, ice-scoured lip to the corrie lake the basalt and gabbro wall of rock shows a thin grey streak of ice-shattered scree. The two thousand foot, “Great Stone Shoot,” gives a narrow but climbable rocky desert. Three hours in and we reach the col at the base of the summit. One final scramble and this view south welcomes us at 11:22. On top of the world, level with powder-puff clouds we peer down on a balmy Hebridean Sea, Rum, Soay, Rubha an Dunain peninsula, Loch Brittle and the beach campsite. Further on the horizon the southern end of the Outer Hebrides, as far as Barra, can be seen, over eighty miles distant. How this feels like a God-like throne – Shared by us – mere mortals. Panorama from Sgurr Alasdair, 993 m. (3,258 feet), Isle of Skye. Poem. A seat with the Gods. Brush the clouds. Touch the sky. Nigh on one thousand metres up on precipitous ridges of gabbro, basalt and bands of quartz. On the serrated, pinnacled, fragmented remnant ridge of a long-time extinct and exploded super-volcano. Having clambered past the Fairy Pools, The Cioch, Coire Lagan, the Inaccessible Pinnacle and two thousand foot of sharp, shattered scree making up the Great Stone Chute and the final summit arête, this is the view southwards. To stand here. And see this. It is surreal. Spiritual. An honour. A privilege. A sight that relatively few have seen. But those that have seen it, will not forget. To see for 80-100 miles in all directions. To see Ben Nevis, An Teallach, Ben More on Mull, Canna, Rum, Eigg, Muck and Soay. And to see a large part of the incredible Isle of Skye, itself, and the Outer Hebrides. It is too much to take in, too much to believe. I shall have to return and confirm that it was real, not, merely, a wonderful dream!
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P1450544
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