Rock Climbing Photos

Italy / Belluno - Tofana di Rozes
Italy / Belluno - Tofana di Rozes Italien / Belluno - Tofana di Rozes Tofana di Rozes seen from Monte Nuvolau (2,574 m) Tofana di Rozes vom Monte Nuvolau (2.574 m) gesehen Tofane is a mountain group in the Dolomites of northern Italy, west of Cortina d'Ampezzo in the province of Belluno, Veneto. Most of the Tofane lies within Parco naturale delle Dolomiti d'Ampezzo, a nature park. Peaks The highest peaks of the Tofane group are Tofana di Mezzo (3,244 m (10,643 ft)), Tofana di Dentro (3,238 m (10,623 ft)), and Tofana di Rozes (3,225 m (10,581 ft)). Tofana di Mezzo is the third highest peak in the Dolomites, after Marmolada (3,343 m (10,968 ft)) and Antelao (3,262 m (10,702 ft)). All three peaks were first climbed by Paul Grohmann along with local mountain guides, in 1863 (Tofana di Mezzo - with Francesco Lacedelli), 1864 (Tofana di Rozes - with Francesco Lacedelli, Angelo Dimai and Santo Siorpaes) and 1865 (Tofana di Dentro - with Angelo Dimai). Geology The Dolomites were formed during the Cretaceous Period, approximately 60 million years ago, due to the collision of the African and European continents. The Tofane is largely formed from the Upper Triassic rock Dolomia principale. The strata are perceptibly folded, and the mountains are finally formed by wind, rain, glaciers and rivers. Tourism Access A cable lift system (Freccia nel Cielo, "Arrow in the sky") goes from Cortina almost to the top of Tofane di Mezzo. There is only a short walk from the top cable car to the summit. Alternatively the via ferratas VF Punta Anna and VF Gianna Aglio can be used to reach Tofane di Mezzo. Cabins (rifugi) Some of the cabins in the Tofane are the Rifugio Angelo Dibona (2,083 m (6,834 ft)), the Rifugio Giussani (2,580 m (8,465 ft)), the Rifugio Duca d'Aosta (2,098 m (6,883 ft)), and the Rifugio Pomedes (2,303 m (7,556 ft)). Via ferratas The via ferratas of Tofane are VF Punta Anna and VF Gianna Aglio on Tofana di Mezzo, VF Lamon and VF Formenton on Tofana di Dentro, and VF Giovanni Lipella on Tofana di Rozes, where there also are tunnel systems from World War I. History During the First World War, the Tofane was a battlefield of the Italian Front for clashes between the Italian and Austro-Hungarian forces. The front lines went through the mountains. At the 1956 Winter Olympics, Mount Tofane hosted five of the six alpine skiing events. It regularly hosts women's speed events on the World Cup circuit, and hosted the World Championships in 2021. The men's 1956 downhill and the current women's World Cup races are on the Olimpia delle Tofane ski race course (often referred to as “Tofana” for short); it is famous for the Tofana Schuss, where athletes can reach speeds over 130 kilometres per hour (81 mph). (Wikipedia) Tofana di Rozes (3,225 metres (10,581 ft)) is a mountain of the Dolomites in the Province of Belluno, Veneto, Italy. Located west of the resort of Cortina d'Ampezzo, the mountain's giant three-edged pyramid shape and its vertical south face, above the Falzarego Pass, makes it the most popular peak in the Tofane group, and one of the most popular in the Dolomites. History From May 1915 to July 1916, the mountain and its surroundings was the location of fierce fighting between Italian and German, later Austrio-Hungarian, troops, as part of the Italian front in World War I. West of the main face, and separated from the mountain by a steep and rocky gully, is the Castelletto, a narrow, long rock 700 feet high. In 1915 it was occupied by a German platoon, which, armed with a machine gun and sniper rifles, wreaked havoc on the Italian troops in the valley. They were soon replaced by Austrian soldiers, and from their strategic position they prevented any Italian plans for a push north. For the Alpini, the Italian mountain infantry specialists, retaking the Castelletto became a prime objective. Two of their climbers, Ugo Vallepiana and Giuseppe Gaspard, climbed up the Tofana to a ledge a few hundred feet above the Castelletto, but their guns were not very successful. One summer night four Alpini climbed up the Castelletto but they were discovered and shot. An attack through the gully, taking advantage of the morning fog, was also unsuccessful (machine gunners shot the advancing soldiers when the fog thinned a little), as was a massive attack from three sides in the fall of 1915. So, in February 1916 the Italians, led by Lt. Luigi Malvezzi [it], started tunneling into the Castelletto, first with hammers and chisels and then, in March, with pneumatic drills, and with teams of over two dozen men, working four six-hour shifts, they tunneled up to 30 feet per day. The steep tunnel was 500 meters long, and 2,200 cubic meters of rubble were removed. Its adit was in a "sheltered position within a natural ravine", accessed by a long ladder and thus logistically very demanding. One part of the tunnel brought them under the Austrian position, where they filled a cavern, 16 by 16 feet and 7 feet high, with 77,000 pounds of gelignite. The other led to what was to be an attack position, to be opened with a smaller batch of explosives. On July 11, at 3:30 AM, the gelignite was exploded, with King Victor Emmanuel III and the army's chief of staff, General Luigi Cadorna, looking on. The Austrian commander was Hans Schneeberger, an orphan from Brandberg, Tyrol, who at age 19 replaced a commander who had been killed by an Italian sniper. When the explosions happened, some two dozen Austrian soldiers were killed instantly, but Schneeberger and a few survivors had rifles and grenades, and were able to repel the Italians from the edge of the crater. The attack as a whole was a failure: soldiers were to lower themselves from the Tofana to attack the Castelletto, but the explosion destroyed their ropes. To make matters worse, the explosion used up so much oxygen that Malvezzi and his men, going through the attack tunnel, passed out because of toxic gases including carbon monoxide; some of the men died. Finally, the explosion damaged the rock face on the east, sending huge boulders down the gully and killing incoming Italian soldiers. The next day, Italians had hauled machine guns up the face of the Tofana; Schneeberger sent one of his men to ask for reinforcements, which arrived that night. A few hours later the Italians attacked the relief platoon, and the Austrians withdrew to the Castelletto's northern end, and pulled their troops away altogether after a few days.[2] Malvezzi received the Military Order of Savoy. Climbing Most climbs start from the north, where the mountain is a relatively easy hike, or the west face, where the summit can be reached by a via ferrata. The south face, however, is a much more difficult challenge, with many of the routes being either fifth or sixth graded climbs. The mountain was first climbed in 1864 by Paul Grohmann and local hunter Francesco Lacedelli. The south face was first climbed in 1901. Via Ferrata A via ferrata starts at the restored entrance to the mine tunnel at the Castelletto, and leads to the summit of the mountain; along the way one finds a memorial to Giovanni Lipella,[8] an Italian soldier who died on the mountain on 15 June 1918 and was posthumously awarded the Gold Medal of Military Valour. Cave The Grotta di Tofana is one of only a few natural caves in dolomite rather than regular limestone. It is accessible by way of a via ferrata that starts some 40 minutes from Rifugio Dibona. The cave is some 300 meters deep, and the roof is up to 10 meters high. The cave has been quite popular with tourists, and was listed by Baedeker as "a large cavern accessible by ladders" and as an interesting visit. (Wikipedia) Das Dreigestirn der Tofane (italienisch Tofane, deutsch auch Tofana) gehört zu den bekanntesten und markantesten Dolomitenmassiven. Die Tofane liegen westlich von Cortina d’Ampezzo und überragen das Valle del Boite (Boitetal). Eine gewisse Bekanntheit erlangte der Name durch die Skirennstrecke Olimpia delle Tofane, 1956 Austragungsort der olympischen Herrenabfahrt. Lage und Umgebung Das Tofane-Massiv liegt westlich von Cortina d’Ampezzo über dem oberen Valle del Boite und ist Teil des Parco Naturale delle Dolomiti d’Ampezzo. Während die beiden höheren Gipfel Tofana di Mezzo und Tofana di Dentro ein kompaktes Massiv bilden, wirkt die südliche Tofana di Rozes einigermaßen eigenständig. Zwischen diesen Felsgiganten schneidet sich die Forcella Fontananegra (2561 m) ein. Im Westen und Norden trennt das Val Travenanzes das Gebirgsmassiv von der Fanesgruppe, im Osten das obere Valle del Boite vom Pomagnonzug (und der Cristallogruppe) und im Süden das Falzaregotal von der Nuvolaugruppe. Von Cortina gesehen ist den beiden höheren Tofane eine Wandstufe vorgelagert, die mit dem Südostgrat der mittleren Tofana eine Art „Felsenring“ bildet. Gipfel Das Massiv besteht im Wesentlichen aus den drei Dreitausender-Gipfeln, die allesamt beliebte Tourenziele darstellen. Alle drei rangieren unter den zehn höchsten Gipfeln der Dolomiten. Die in der Mitte gelegene Tofana di Mezzo (auch Tofana II) ist mit einer Höhe von 3244 m s.l.m. die höchste der drei Tofane und zugleich nach der Marmolata (3343 m) und dem Antelao (3264 m) der dritthöchste Dolomitenberg. Die Tofana di Dentro (hintere Tofana, auch Tofana III) hat eine Gipfelhöhe von 3238 m s.l.m. und bildet den nördlichsten der drei Felsriesen. Die Tofana di Rozes (vordere Tofana, auch Tofana I) ist 3225 m s.l.m. hoch und vor allem für ihre imposante Südwand (Tofana Sud) bekannt. Geologie Bereits 1873 setzte sich Hermann Loretz geologisch mit dem Gebiet um die Tofane auseinander. Edmund Mojsisovics von Mojsvár lieferte mit seiner Arbeit zu den Dolomit-Riffen (1879) weitere wichtige Aufschlüsse, die Leopold Kober 1908 vertiefte. Die Tofane werden aus mächtigem triassischem Hauptdolomit (Dachsteindolomit) aufgebaut, der leicht Richtung Norden einfällt. In den Gipfelbereichen wird er von jurassischen Kalken (früher als Lias bezeichnet) überlagert. Der Grat zwischen Tofana II und III gewährt gute Einblicke in die Schichtfolge und lässt Neokom und Oberjura erkennen, während in den untersten Bereichen ältere Gesteine wie Sandsteine, Kalkmergel und Tuffe zu Tage treten, die ein auffälliges grünes Band formen. Der Komplex von Tofana II und III wird außerdem von einer nach Westen überschlagenen Falte geprägt, deren Mächtigkeit allerdings nur die obersten 200 Meter umfasst. Nach Süden hin setzt sich diese tektonische Störung fort. Am Südgrat der Tofana II befindet sich mit dem Bus de Tofana eines der größten Felsenfenster der Alpen. Geschichte Die Erstbegehungen der drei Gipfel erfolgten nacheinander in den Jahren 1863 bis 1865. Paul Grohmann bestieg mit verschiedenen Führern zuerst die Tofana di Mezzo (1863), dann die Tofana di Rozes (1864) und schließlich die Tofana di Fuori (1865), allesamt von Cortina aus. Alpinistisch war in der Folge vor allem die Südwand der Tofana di Rozes von Interesse, die 1901 durch Ilona und Rolanda von Eötvös mit Führern erstmals durchstiegen wurde. Während des Ersten Weltkriegs bildeten die Tofane eines der Zentren der Ersten Dolomitenoffensive. Die italienischen Alpini besetzten im Juli 1915 die Gipfel von Tofana II und Tofana III und versuchten von dort aus die österreich-ungarische Sperre im Travenanzestal zu erobern. Die Tofana I wurde wiederum kurzzeitig von Jägern des Deutschen Alpenkorps eingenommen. Kriegsrelikte wie Stollen und verfallene Stellungen zeugen heute noch von den erbitterten Kämpfen. Mit den Olympischen Winterspielen 1956 in Cortina d’Ampezzo hielt der Massentourismus erstmals Einzug in die Gegend. Während die Skigebiete mit der heute noch als Weltcupstrecke genutzten Olimpia delle Tofane am Osthang von Tofana di Mezzo/Dentro entstanden, blieb die Spitze bis zum Bau der Seilbahn Freccia nel cielo (deutsch: Himmelspfeil) 1971 verschont. Davor waren bereits mehrere Klettersteige angelegt worden, die sich heute großer Beliebtheit erfreuen, darunter die Via ferrata Giuseppe Olivieri auf die mittlere Tofana (1957), die Via ferrata Giovanni Lipella auf die Tofana di Rozes (1967) und die Via ferrata Formenton auf die Tofana di Dentro. (Wikipedia) Die Tofana di Rozes (auch Vordere Tofana oder Tofana I) ist ein 3225 m s.l.m. hoher Berg in den Dolomiten in der italienischen Provinz Belluno. Mit ihrer berühmten Südwand bildet sie die eindrucksvollste, wenn auch niedrigste Erhebung der dreigipfeligen Tofane westlich von Cortina d’Ampezzo. Lage und Umgebung Die Tofana di Rozes ist der südlichste der drei Tofana-Gipfel und von der Tofana di Mezzo durch die Forcella Fontananegra (2561 m) getrennt. In diesem Bereich liegen das Rifugio Giussani und das nicht mehr bewirtschaftete Rifugio Cantore. Im Westen trennt die Forcella Bois (2331 m) den Felskoloss vom Lagazuoistock, im Westen und Norden bildet das Val Travenanzes die Grenze zur Fanesgruppe. Von Norden gesehen erscheint der Berg als dreikantige Felspyramide, nach Süden zeigt er eine der imposantesten Wände der Dolomiten, die meist als Tofana Sud bezeichnet wird. Trotz der niedrigsten Gipfelhöhe ist der Berg gerade aufgrund dieser 800 Meter hohen Südwand das bekannteste Motiv der Tofane. Im unteren Wandabschnitt liegt mit der Grotta della Tofana eine mehrere Meter tiefe Höhle, die bereits von Paul Grohmann besucht wurde. Alpinismus Die Erstbesteigung gelang am 29. August 1864 Paul Grohmann mit den Einheimischen Francesco Lacedelli, Angelo Dimai und Santo Siorpaes. Grohmann und Lacedelli hatten im Jahr zuvor bereits die Tofana di Mezzo erstbestiegen. Ähnlich wie bei deren Erschließung wählten sie den Anstieg aus der Forcella Fontananegra über die Nordostflanke, den heutigen Normalweg. Grohmann äußerte sich begeistert über die Aussicht vom Gipfel: „Ich bin kein Freund davon zur Schilderung einer Aussicht zahllose Bergspitzen herzuzählen, und unterlasse dieses auch hier, unvergesslich aber bleibt mir ein Detailbild der Rundsicht: die furchtbaren Schrofen der beiden anderen Tofanaspitzen in nächster Nähe, und zwischen diesen blickt weiter hinten der Gaisl vor, die Croda rossa der Ampezzaner; nur der oberste Theil, aber dieser blutroth, ein seltsamer Contrast gegen die grauen Kalkwände der Tofana!“ Im August 1901 meisterten Ilona und Rolanda von Eötvös mit Antonio Dimai, Giovanni Siorpaes und Agostino Verzi erstmals die kolossale Südwand. Die Via Eötvös-Dimai (IV) gilt heute als eine der klassischen Routen in den Dolomiten. Die durch wuchtige Pfeiler auffällig gegliederte Wand wurde im Laufe des 20. Jahrhunderts auf fast 30 verschiedenen Routen durchstiegen. Zu den bedeutendsten gehören etwa der zweite Pfeiler (Secondo Pilastro, VI), der 1946 von Ettore Constantini und Luigi Ghedina erstmals bewältigt wurde, oder die 1952 durch Walter Bonatti und P. Contini erschlossene Via delle Tridentina (ebenfalls VI). Weitere wichtige Erstbegehungen gelangen Angelo Dibona, Walter Stößer und Attilio Tissi. Im Ersten Weltkrieg galt die Tofana di Rozes als besonders umkämpfter Berg. Am 22. Juli 1915 nahm eine Patrouille des dritten Jäger-Regiments im Deutschen Alpenkorps im Zuge der Ersten Dolomitenoffensive den bis dahin unbesetzten Gipfel ein. Man konnte die Tofana I bis zum 18. September gegen die Italiener verteidigen. Aufstieg Trotz der imposanten Erscheinung ist die Tofana di Rozes – sieht man von der Seilbahn-Erschließung der Tofana di Mezzo ab – von den drei Tofana-Gipfeln am leichtesten zu ersteigen. Dem Nicht-Kletterer bieten sich für den Aufstieg zur Tofana di Rozes zwei Möglichkeiten. Der Normalweg führt vom Rifugio Giussani (2580 m) unschwierig über geröllbedeckten Fels zum Nordwestgrat und über diesen schließlich zum Gipfel. Firnreste sind im oberen Bereich keine Seltenheit. Eine zweite Variante bietet die 1967 eröffnete Via ferrata Giovanni Lipella (Schwierigkeit C/D). Diese wird zumeist vom Rifugio Angelo Dibona (2083 m) aus in Angriff genommen. Der Weg führt zunächst unter der mächtigen Südwand entlang zum Einstieg, wo gleich ein steiler Stollen durchquert werden muss. Danach verläuft der Steig an der Westseite des Berges Richtung Norden zu den Tre Dita (2694 m) und macht schließlich einen Knick nach Süden. Nach dem Ausstieg erreicht man den Normalweg und über diesen den Gipfel. (Wikipedia) Der Monte Nuvolau ist ein 2574 m s.l.m. hoher Berg in der gleichnamigen Berggruppe in den Ampezzaner Dolomiten. Er befindet sich zwischen den etwas höheren Nachbarbergen Monte Averau und Monte Gusela. Die Berggruppe liegt zwischen dem Falzaregopass und dem Passo di Giau im Grenzgebiet der Gemeinden Cortina d’Ampezzo und Colle Santa Lucia. Von beiden Pässen führen Routen auf den Berg. Auf dem Gipfel des Monte Nuvolau befindet sich das Rifugio Nuvolau. Bereits 1883 angelegt, war es die älteste Schutzhütte im Berggebiet von Cortina d’Ampezzo. Sie wurde mit Hilfe einer Spende des sächsischen Offiziers Richard von Meerheimb errichtet, die er als Dank für seine Heilung von einer Lungenkrankheit in Cortina d’Ampezzo geleistet hatte. Aus diesem Grunde trug sie anfangs den Namen „Sachsendank“. Wegen ihrer extremen Gipfellage und damit einhergehend fehlender Fahrwege bietet die Hütte nicht denselben Komfort wie viele andere Alpinhütten. So gibt es im Rifugio Nuvolau weder Warmwasser noch Duschen. Die Versorgung erfolgt per Materialseilbahn vom nordöstlich gelegenen, per Weg erreichbaren Rifugio Cinque Torri am gleichnamigen Berg. Die Nuvolauhütte war während des Gebirgskriegs 1915–1918 ein wichtiger Aussichtspunkt. Die Rundumsicht vom Gipfel des Monte Nuvolau schließt den westsüdwestlich gelegenen Gletscher der Marmolata, im Westen den Col di Lana und dahinter die Sellagruppe und im Norden die Tofane ein. Im Osten werden jenseits von Cortina d’Ampezzo die Cristallogruppe und Sorapiss sichtbar. Die Fernsicht im Norden reicht bis zum österreichischen Alpenhauptkamm. Der Gipfel ist im Vergleich zu anderen berühmten Aussichtsbergen einfach zu erreichen. Die Normalroute führt vom südlich gelegenen Passo di Giau in etwa eineinhalb Stunden auf den Gipfel. Vom Norden her beginnt der Zugang an einem Parkplatz an der Strada Statale 48 delle Dolomiti. Von dort führt ein Sessellift zum Rifugio Scoiattoli in 2225 Metern Höhe. Die fehlenden rund 350 Höhenmeter können in etwa eineinviertel Stunden bewältigt werden. Der Dolomiten-Höhenweg Nummer 1, auch Klassischer Weg genannt, führt am Monte Nuvolau entlang, eine Variante beinhaltet den Weg zur Hütte mit anschließendem Abstieg an der Ostseite des Berges. (Wikipedia)
All Rights Reserved
The path from Looe to Talland
The path from Looe to Talland South, south-west past Chimney Rock and Hannafore Point, onwards to Samphire Beach and Bridge Rocks at Portnandler Bay. Overlooked all the while from the higher ground by the ever-present 'measured nautical mile' or, if you’re agreeable to such things, by the ghosts from the tiny chapel that once graced the hill. Glancing south, while you can, over the water to Dunker Point on St George’s Island before you reach the point where you can only look forward on the path. Westwards, on, past the Hore Stone, then Aesop’s Bed, the well-trodden and slowly hollowing path, dips then climbs, softly zigging and zagging with the natural lie of the land. Crowds of cheering dandelions line the route as though gathered solely for each new path-goer’s arrival. Ferns, that trace their ancestors back to the middle Devonian, dance on the moment’s breeze, knowing they’ll one day fade from forest green to russet brown in the wake of the strimmer men. The strimmer men who clear the way and cut things back. And up ahead, where the line of the path meanders towards the crest of the emerging hills, white-painted houses descend the slopes, ever testing the green-belt nature of this once secluded place; Talland Bay.
  • 44 times seen on flickr
  • Taken on July 10, 2020
  • Uploaded on February 3, 2023
  • More from Martin FRSA:
  • More from anybody:
All Rights Reserved
Loch'd in Winter
Loch'd in Winter Looking across the cold water of Loch Muick along what once used to be a jetty which Queen Victoria used to sail on the Loch. The surrounding mountains are covered in snow as we head down the Loch to start the climb to Dubh Loch, meaning Black Lake, sounds ominous!!
All Rights Reserved
Bobcat
Bobcat A bit of a mystery surrounds this bobcat's presence in Yellowstone's Firehole Canyon in mid January. He fed on a deer carcass for the better part of a week. The deer presumably fell 400 feet to its death from a nearby rock wall and lay in a large depression in the snow. Another depression was just above the carcass. Some feel the bobcat chased the deer off the cliff and plummeted to the snowbank near the river along with it. Having been there, it seems remarkable that anything could have survived such a fall. Perhaps it climbed part way down and jumped from a lower spot on the rock face. We'll never know exactly what happened, but I feel very blessed to have been able to see and photograph this beautiful cat.
  • 80 times seen on flickr
  • Taken on January 16, 2023
  • Uploaded on February 3, 2023
  • More from Steve Santel:
  • More from anybody:
All Rights Reserved
Bobcat
Bobcat A bit of a mystery surrounds this bobcat's presence in Yellowstone's Firehole Canyon in mid January. He fed on a deer carcass for the better part of a week. The deer presumably fell 400 feet to its death from a nearby rock wall and lay in a large depression in the snow. Another depression was just above the carcass and can be seen in this photo. Some feel the bobcat chased the deer off the cliff and plummeted to the snowbank near the river along with it. Having been there, it seems remarkable that anything could have survived such a fall. Perhaps it climbed part way down and jumped from a lower spot on the rock face. We'll never know exactly what happened, but I feel very blessed to have been able to see and photograph this beautiful cat.
  • 72 times seen on flickr
  • Taken on January 16, 2023
  • Uploaded on February 2, 2023
  • More from Steve Santel:
  • More from anybody:
All Rights Reserved